Clean Your ARTERIES with GOOD FOOD!

Overtime your arteries can begin to accumulate plaque and if you’re not careful, you may not even notice until the damage is done. Heart disease can creep up on your body and so can the risk for heart attack or stroke too. Detoxing your arteries should be part of your daily ritual and can be accomplished through a healthy diet.
By making certain artery cleansing foods a part of your diet, you can keep your arteries running clean long into old age. Here are some heart healthy foods you should add to your grocery list:
1. Kiwi- Kiwis are loaded with flavonoids that cleanse your blood vessels and decrease inflammation. They’re also loaded with fiber, which reduces cholesterol and reduces your risk of heart disease.
2. Shrimp- While shrimp do have cholesterol, they also contain taurine, an amino acid which protects the arteries from fat crossing the intestinal wall.
3. Avocado- Avocados have been shown to reduce total blood cholesterol by an average of 17 points. A compound called beta-sitosterol does the work. Cholesterol plays a big role in your arteries because high cholesterol levels build up plaque along the artery walls. Blood vessels can become blocked and even rupture, causing heart attack, stroke, and cardiovascular disease.
4. Olive Oil- One of the polyphenols in olive oil, hydroxytyrosol, helps protect the cells that line your blood vessels from being damaged by overly reactive oxygen molecules. Therefore, it keeps the blood flowing through your arteries flowing strong.






Risk Factors of Peripheral Artery Disease

Peripheral artery disease (also called peripheral arterial disease) is a common circulatory problem in which narrowed arteries reduce blood flow to your limbs. Factors that increase your risk of developing peripheral artery disease include:
-Smoking
-Diabetes
-Obesity
(a body mass index over 30)
-High blood pressure (140/90 millimeters of mercury or higher)
-High cholesterol (total blood cholesterol over 240 milligrams per deciliter, or 6.2 millimoles per liter)
-Increasing age, especially after reaching 50 years of age
-A family history of peripheral artery disease, heart disease or stroke
-High levels of homocysteine, a protein component that helps build and maintain tissue
People who smoke or have diabetes have the greatest risk of developing peripheral artery disease due to reduced blood flow.






When We Stop Breathing at Night…

The most common type of sleep apnea is called obstructive sleep apnea. It happens because the muscles in your throat relax, blocking the flow of air to your lungs. Your airway might be completely blocked or only partly blocked. When you stop breathing, the amount of oxygen in your blood drops. Your brain recognizes this and makes your body start breathing again.
If you have sleep apnea, there are times during the night when you stop breathing for 10 seconds or longer.

Your doctor needs to know how often there is a pause in your breathing. This helps to determine how severe your problem is. You might be asked to stay overnight in a sleep laboratory. Or your doctor might ask you to have your breathing measured at home.
Here’s one guide that doctors use:
-If your breathing is affected between five and 15 times an hour, you have mild sleep apnea.
-If your breathing is affected between 16 and 30 times an hour, you have moderate sleep apnea.
-If your breathing is affected more than 31 times an hour, you have severe sleep apnea.

People with severe sleep apnea may be at an increased risk of high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke and dying early.






Drink Coffee! Live Longer?

Drinking coffee can not only boost your energy but also your longevity. That’s the key finding of a new federal health study of nearly a half-million coffee drinkers that found those who regularly enjoy a cup of java live longer than those who don’t.
The National Institutes of Health study, published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine, indicated that caffeinated and decaf coffee drinkers were less likely to die from heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, injuries and accidents, diabetes, and infections.
In an interview published this week in the Journal of Caffeine Research, Neal Freedman — with the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the NIH National Cancer Institute — said his study is among the most comprehensive to date of the health benefits of coffee and has significant implications for java junkies. Researchers tracked 500,000 U.S. men and women — ages 50 to 71, all members of the American Association of Retired Persons — for about 12 years.
Not only did the results show a clear association between coffee and longevity, Freedman said, but they also indicated people who drank the most coffee tended to have greatest health benefits.






Worldwide Rising of Peripheral Artery Disease!

The number of people with peripheral artery disease — a debilitating condition that can lead to heart attack and stroke — rose nearly 24 percent, from 164 million to 202 million worldwide, over the past decade.

An analysis from 2000 to 2010 found that although rates of peripheral artery disease are increasing in all parts of the world, 70 percent (140 million) of sufferers live in low- or middle-income countries, mainly in southeast Asia (54 million) and western Pacific regions (46 million).
Peripheral artery disease is caused by plaque accumulation in arteries that carry blood to the limbs. The condition increases the risk of heart attack and stroke and severely limits walking ability.
The analysis of published studies on peripheral artery disease also revealed that the number of people with the condition increased nearly 29 percent in low-income countries and by 13 percent in high-income countries, mainly in Europe, where there were 40.5 million cases in 2010.
Longer life expectancy and changing lifestyles appear to be driving this dramatic rise. There was a more than 35 percent increase in cases among people older than 80, and peripheral artery disease now affects one in 10 people aged 70 and one in six people older than 80.
Rates of the disease are higher among men in high-income countries than men in low- and middle-income countries, and it may be more common in women — especially younger women — than in men in low- and middle-income countries, according to the findings, which were published July 31 in the journal The Lancet.
Many of the main risk factors for peripheral artery disease — such as smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol — are the same as those for other major cardiovascular diseases and can be prevented and treated, the analysis confirmed.