What is Exercise Induced Asthma?

Exercise induced asthma (EIA) occurs when a person begins to experience asthma symptoms brought on by exercise or while engaging in high energy physical activity such as sports. It is especially likely to occur during colder weather and symptoms may include shortness of breath, a feeling of pressure or tightness in the chest, wheezing, coughing, sore throat, headache, and fatigue. Symptoms can last up to one hour, but have been known to last for several days.
Causes
While the exact cause of exercise induced asthma hasn’t yet been pinpointed, the most widely accepted theory suggests that the hard and fast deep breathing brought on by exercise allows the passageways in the lungs to become overly cool and dry. When that happens the muscles of the lungs begin to tighten and become narrower, irritating the lining of the lungs which then leads to inflammation and the formation of mucous. As these things occur the sufferer will begin to feel the familiar asthma like symptoms that make it harder to breathe.
The following are common triggers of EIA attacks in those who are susceptible:
-Participating in sports activities during cold weather when the air is dryer. Reports of EIA attacks rise in winter.
-Exercise – This includes any form of gym or sport activity which increases the rate of breaths taken per minute over an extended period of time. EIA attacks may also be triggered by not properly preparing for gym routines or sporting activities like football.
-Exposure to irritants – Exercising or playing sports in close proximity to things that may aggravate the lungs can cause an EIA episode. These irritants may include pet dander, dust, pollen, tobacco smoke, and chemicals like chlorine.






Is your Asthma Under Control?

No matter what type of asthma you have, an important step in managing your asthma is to find out if your asthma is under control. Uncontrolled asthma symptoms can have a bigger impact than you may realize. And if you have had a recent asthma attack, this may mean you are more likely to have another one.
Your asthma may not be under control if one or more of the following are true for you.
Do you:
-Have symptoms more than 2 days a week?
-Limit or avoid daily activities?
-Wake up at night because of coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath?
-Use your rescue inhaler more than 2 times a week?
-Have peak flow or FEV1 readings below your personal best?
-Need emergency medical care due to asthma symptoms more than once a year?

If you think you may have uncontrolled asthma, it’s important to talk to your doctor as soon as possible.






Panic Attack when you’re Sleeping?

Nighttime (nocturnal) panic attacks occur with no obvious trigger and awaken you from sleep. As with a daytime panic attack, you may experience sweating, rapid heart rate, trembling, shortness of breath, heavy breathing (hyperventilation), flushing or chills, and a sense of impending doom. These signs and symptoms are quite alarming and can mimic those of a heart attack or other serious medical condition. Although nocturnal panic attacks usually last less than 10 minutes, it may take a while to calm down and go back to sleep after you have one.
It’s not known what causes panic attacks. Underlying factors may include genetics, stress and certain changes in the way parts of your brain work. In some cases, an underlying condition, such as a sleep disorder, can cause panic-like signs and symptoms. Talk with your doctor about your symptoms and whether you should have any tests for a possible underlying condition.
Treatment including medications and mental health counseling (cognitive behavioral therapy) can help prevent panic attacks — and reduce their intensity when they do occur.