Chiropractor’s Therapy

At your initial visit, your chiropractor will ask questions about your health history and perform a physical exam, with particular attention to your spine. Your chiropractor may also recommend other examinations or tests, such as X-rays.
During the adjustment- During a typical chiropractic adjustment, your chiropractor places you in specific positions to treat affected areas. Often, you’re positioned lying face-down on a specially designed, padded chiropractic table. The chiropractor uses his or her hands to apply a controlled, sudden force to a joint, pushing it beyond its normal range of motion. You may hear popping or cracking sounds as your chiropractor moves your joints during the treatment session.
Additional therapies- Your chiropractor may recommend other treatment approaches in combination with chiropractic adjustment, such as:
Heat or ice
Massage
Stretching
Electrical stimulation
Exercise
Weight loss

After the adjustment- Some people experience minor side effects for a few days after chiropractic adjustment. These may include headache, fatigue or pain in the parts of the body that were treated.
Video: Physical Therapy






Get Anxiety and Stress in check… Sleep Better!

Do you find yourself unable to sleep or waking up night after night? Residual stress, worry, and anger from your day can make it very difficult to sleep well. When you wake up or can’t get to sleep, take note of what seems to be the recurring theme. That will help you figure out what you need to do to get your stress and anger under control during the day.
If you can’t stop yourself from worrying, especially about things outside your control, you need to learn how to manage your thoughts. For example, you can learn to evaluate your worries to see if they’re truly realistic and replace irrational fears with more productive thoughts. Even counting sheep is more productive than worrying at bedtime.
If the stress of managing work, family, or school is keeping you awake, you may need help with stress management. By learning how to manage your time effectively, handle stress in a productive way, and maintain a calm, positive outlook, you’ll be able to sleep better at night.
Relaxation techniques for better sleep
Relaxation is beneficial for everyone, but especially for those struggling with sleep. Practicing relaxation techniques before bed is a great way to wind down, calm the mind, and prepare for sleep. Some simple relaxation techniques include:
-Deep breathing. Close your eyes, and try taking deep, slow breaths, making each breath even deeper than the last.
-Progressive muscle relaxation. Starting with your toes, tense all the muscles as tightly as you can, then completely relax. Work your way up from your feet to the top of your head.
-Visualizing a peaceful, restful place. Close your eyes and imagine a place or activity that is calming and peaceful for you. Concentrate on how relaxed this place or activity makes you feel.






Super Foods for Super Brains!

Super foods are packed with nutrients that have health-enhancing properties ranging from prevention of heart disease and cancer to improving skin tone and boosting memory and brain function. Their health benefits may be overstated but they do provide the recommended nutrients when included as part of balanced diet. Here are 5 super foods that help boost brain function and improve memory.
1-Milk is rich in vitamin B6, vitamin B12, calcium, magnesium and potassium – all of which are necessary for improving memory and cognitive functions. But what is especially beneficial to brain health is the milk protein, especially cow milk protein. The cow milk protein is made up of 20 percent whey protein and 80 percent casein protein. The whey protein is a mixture of alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin and serum albumin. A research study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reveals that dietary protein rich in alpha-lactalbumin (cow milk protein in this case) improves cognitive performance in stress-vulnerable people by increasing brain serotonin activity levels.
2-Broccoli, a cruciferous vegetable from the cabbage family, is a super food because scientists have found that it can protect the brain following injury. Broccoli contains a chemical called sulforaphane that helps strengthen the protective network of capillaries called the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a semi-permeable lining made of tiny capillaries; it protects the brain from ‘foreign substances’ which may injure the brain. The BBB also maintains a constant environment for the brain.
3-Potato may seem to be the least likely food for improving memory or brain function, but in fact the baked potato with flesh and skin and without salt is a very healthy, low calorie, high fiber food. It is a good source of vitamin C, vitamin B6, potassium and manganese – all of which are beneficial to brain health.
4-Mango is rich in vitamin C, vitamin B6 and vitamins K, A and E. Fruits like mangoes and banana are high in vitamin B6 content and are therefore good for brain health.
5-Honey is the oldest natural sweetener known to man. Honey is made up of equal parts of glucose and fructose and it contains a variety of B-vitamins, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium and anti-oxidants – all of which are good for brain health.






Back Pain and Stress

The causes of back pain are varied, but stress often plays a part. Our bodies are bombarded with stress every day, whether chemical stress in the form of ingested or inhaled chemicals and toxins, emotional/mental stress in the form of worry, fear, anger and other thoughts or emotions, or physical stress in the form of overtaxing of certain muscle groups.
A typical “day at the office” includes plenty of all three types of stress: you may sit at your desk, hunched over your keyboard in an unhealthy posture for hours, anxious about meeting a deadline and skipping a healthy lunch in favor of a quick snack of preservative-laden junk food. All of these stressors take their toll on the body, and soon you find you have pain in your back and possibly elsewhere.
Finding ways to reduce or eliminate stress can go a long way to preventing back pain and problems. But in the meantime, learn about a safe, natural back pain remedies as an alternative treatment to help address your back pain at its source.
Healing Back Pain Naturally- The key to effectively dealing with your back pain is to identify and work with the cause, rather than just treating the symptoms. Chiropractic does just that. It’s a natural, drug-free, non-invasive method of working with the body to restore proper function and health. And chiropractic is so successful with back pain that it has become the foremost alternative health approach in the world!






Garlic for Asthma Attacks?

Can garlic help prevent asthma attacks? Evidence suggests that compounds naturally present in garlic can indeed help treat asthma as well as reduce and cure symptoms associated with other respiratory ailments. One nutrient that plays a key role in the ability of garlic to fight asthma is vitamin C. Ounce for ounce, fresh garlic provides more than twice as much vitamin C as tomatoes. Vitamin C helps neutralize free radicals, unstable molecules that cause contraction of airway smooth muscles in asthma sufferers.
Furthermore, research suggests that vitamin C rich foods, such as raw garlic, can promote histamine breakdown and reduce histamine release in the body. Histamine, a natural chemical generated by the body, is involved in many allergic reactions and is known to promote inflammation in asthma sufferers.
In addition to its effects on histamine release and breakdown, garlic can boost the ability of the body to create prostacyclins. Prostacyclins are lipid molecules that help keep the air passages of the lungs open and thus promote easy breathing in asthmatic individuals.






What is Aerobic Exercise?

Imagine that you’re exercising. You’re working up a sweat, you’re breathing hard, your heart is thumping, blood is coursing through your vessels to deliver oxygen to the muscles to keep you moving, and you sustain the activity for more than just a few minutes. That’s aerobic exercise (also known as “cardio” in gym lingo); any activity that you can sustain for more than just a few minutes while your heart, lungs, and muscles work overtime.
The beginning. It all starts with breathing. The average healthy adult inhales and exhales about 7 to 8 liters of air per minute. Once you fill your lungs, the oxygen in the air (air contains approximately 20% oxygen) is filtered through small branches of tubes (called bronchioles) until it reaches the alveoli. The alveoli are microscopic sacs where oxygen diffuses (enters) into the blood. From there, it’s a beeline direct to the heart.
Getting to the heart of it. The heart has four chambers that fill with blood and pump blood (two atria and two ventricles) and some very active coronary arteries. Because of all this action, the heart needs a fresh supply of oxygen, and as you just learned, the lungs provide it. Once the heart uses what it needs, it pumps the blood, the oxygen, and other nutrients out through the large left ventricle and through the circulatory system to all the organs, muscles, and tissues that need it.
A whole lot of pumping going on. Your heart beats approximately 60-80 times per minute at rest, 100,000 times a day, more than 30 million times per year, and about 2.5 billion times in a 70-year lifetime! Every beat of your heart sends a volume of blood (called stroke volume — more about that later), along with oxygen and many other life-sustaining nutrients, circulating through your body. The average healthy adult heart pumps about 5 liters of blood per minute.
Oxygen consumption and muscles. All that oxygen being pumped by the blood is important. Muscles are like engines that run on fuel (just like an automobile that runs on fuel); only our muscles use fat and carbohydrates instead of gasoline. Oxygen is a key player because, once inside the muscle, it’s used to burn fat and carbohydrate for fuel to keep our engines running. The more efficient our muscles are at consuming oxygen, the more fuel we can burn, the more fit we are, and the longer we can exercise.






Drink Coffee! Live Longer?

Drinking coffee can not only boost your energy but also your longevity. That’s the key finding of a new federal health study of nearly a half-million coffee drinkers that found those who regularly enjoy a cup of java live longer than those who don’t.
The National Institutes of Health study, published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine, indicated that caffeinated and decaf coffee drinkers were less likely to die from heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, injuries and accidents, diabetes, and infections.
In an interview published this week in the Journal of Caffeine Research, Neal Freedman — with the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the NIH National Cancer Institute — said his study is among the most comprehensive to date of the health benefits of coffee and has significant implications for java junkies. Researchers tracked 500,000 U.S. men and women — ages 50 to 71, all members of the American Association of Retired Persons — for about 12 years.
Not only did the results show a clear association between coffee and longevity, Freedman said, but they also indicated people who drank the most coffee tended to have greatest health benefits.






Eat the Right Fats!

With every one percent reduction of total blood cholesterol, there is about a two percent reduction in the risk of heart attack. Getting your total cholesterol down and your HDL, or good cholesterol, up is good medicine. One way to control your cholesterol is by eating the right fats.
Eat foods that are low in saturated fats, that contain mostly monounsaturated fats, and that are high in essential fatty acids. This means eating fats from seafood and plant sources. Minimize foods of animal origin, which are high in saturated fats. Keep your saturated fats to less than ten percent (better is seven percent) of your total daily calories.
Get used to checking the package label for grams of saturated fat per serving. Avoid “hydrogenated” or “partially hydrogenated” oils and shortenings. New insights into the fatty food/heart disease correlation reveal that the amount of saturated fats and hydrogenated fats in a food may actually do more harm to the fats in your blood than the cholesterol in the food. The trans fatty acids in hydrogenated fats do all kinds of bad things to blood fats, such as: increase LDL (bad) cholesterol, decrease HDL (good) cholesterol, increase triglycerides, and increase lipoprotein A – the blood fat that contributes to plaques in the arteries. Look for labels that claim “contains no saturated fats” or “contains no hydrogenated oils.”
Eat more fish that contain omega 3 fatty acids (coldwater fish: seabass, salmon and albacore tuna), which help lower blood fat levels and reduce the risk of blood clots, which can clog arteries and cause strokes and heart attacks. Replacing saturated fats in your diet with unsaturated ones (for example, vegetable and fish oils) can reduce blood LDL levels. Yet, a diet that is too high in polyunsaturated fat (more than 10 percent of daily calories) can suppress production of HDL. Choose monounsaturated fats instead, such as olive oil, canola oil, and nut oils. These monounsaturated fats do not lower HDL levels.






MRI Shows Brain Cell Loss in Parkinson’s

For the first time, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology report, brain imaging has been able to show in living patients the progressive damage Parkinson’s disease causes to two small structures deep in the brain.
The researchers found that people with early stage PD had lost cells in the brain area known as the substantia nigra. In people with more advanced disease, scans showed that cells in the basal forebrain had also been lost.
Scans showed that the volume of the part of the brain called the substantia nigra was smaller in people with early stage PD than in people without the disease, meaning that cells had died in that brain region.
Substantia nigra volume was about the same in people with early stages of PD as in those whose PD was rated as moderate.
Basal forebrain volume was smaller in people with moderate stage of PD than in healthy people or those with early PD.
Basal forebrain volume was about the same in healthy people as in people with early PD.
Until very recently, loss of cells in inner brain structures — the hallmark of PD — could only be reliably observed by studying the brain after death. The new research represents an important tool for seeing and measuring the size of these parts of the brain in people living with PD.






Coconut Oil: a Fat Great Oil!

Coconut oil is one of the richest sources of saturated fat you can find, with around 90% of calories as saturated fat. But is very different from most other cooking oils and contains a unique composition of fatty acids.
The fatty acids are about 90% saturated.
This makes coconut oil highly resistant to oxidation at high heats. For this reason, it is the perfect oil for high-heat cooking methods like frying.
Additionally, coconut oil consists almost entirely of Medium Chain Triglycerides.
These fatty acids go straight from the digestive tract to the liver, where they are likely to be turned into ketone bodies and provide a quick source of energy.
Epileptic patients on ketogenic diets often use these fats to induce ketosis while allowing for a little bit of carbs in the diet.
Coconut oil is rich in saturated medium chain fatty acids. They are resistant to high heat and can easily turn into ketone bodies in the liver.
The virgin coconut oil significantly reduced Total and LDL cholesterol, oxidized LDL, triglycerides and increased HDL (the good) cholesterol.